We light a candle for the fourth night of Hanukkah as a dedication to each of us being good humans, responsible members of the human family, mishpaha.

~ Rabbi Binyamin Biber – slightly adapted

My Dedication

On the fourth night of Chanukah (Wednesday night), I profoundly dedicated myself to being the best human I can be, to being a responsible member of the human family, to helping build a better world.

I am profoundly dedicated to remembering how to play. How have I lost touch with this? Because it’s fun, even when what you’re doing is physically hard. Moving in fun ways, like skipping along the sidewalk; going to a Zumba dance party, and letting go of self-consciousness makes me feel better. when I feel better I do better for myself and for others.

I am profoundly dedicated to loving-kindness. I will start each morning with five minutes for a metta meditation that includes the phrase, “May you be loved,” for each person that I envision.

I am profoundly dedicated to hope, hope of the unflinching sort that acknowledges hard realities and difficult emotions. [Click to Tweet]. Hope that is based on recognizing possibility, on a shared vision for a better world and the belief that with persistence we can individually and collectively move toward that vision.

I am profoundly dedicated to standing in my truth, speaking out when a wrong is done or a truth cries out to be told, and lending energies to larger efforts along with others who share a vision for a better world.

This Week’s Question

What can you do differently each day to bring more purpose, openness, and curiosity to your daily life?

~Jeffrey Davis

Quest2019 leader Jeffrey Davis encourages us to experiment with three practices for purpose, openness and curiosity this week.

A morning practice focused on bringing our dedication to awareness.

I did the metta meditation (described above) yesterday. . I think, whatever I go on to set as devotions in the future, expressing loving-kindness toward self and others will be a strong foundation for all dedications.

A practice through the day for “breaking better,” giving ourselves time away from work, out in nature, open to surprise and discovery.

Yesterday, I bundled up and got out on this 27 degree-with-windchill day for a half hour bike ride. That’s a short ride, but long enough that 10 minutes in,  even with my multiple layers and glove liners, my fingertips got achingly cold. Even so, there was a delightful surprise, captured in the photo at the top of this post.

An evening practice to think back over the day, identify and write about the day’s highlight.

Yesterday’s highlight was getting a planning call scheduled for a writing group I hope to offer in early 2019. I really want to do this, and persisting in this goal over the course of a more than a year, I think it’s going to happen. I’m delighted!

Quest Visionaries

Jeffrey shared his recorded interviews with two Visionaries who talked with him about how they make room for openness and surprise in their days.

Tom Hodgkinson founded the Idler in 1993 and went on to join the Guardian  newspaper as a columnist and head of editorial development. He and partner Gavin Pretor-Pinney then set up their a creative consultancy and undertook editorial and advertising projects for Channel 4, Sony Playstation, Paramount Comedy Channel, John Brown Publishing, Mother ad agency and many more.
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In 2002 Tom quit the commercial world and retired to a farmhouse on the coast of North Devon to write books. His first book How to be Idle was a global best-seller and was followed by How to be FreeThe Idle Parent and Brave Old World.

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Tracy Fullerton, M.F.A., is a game designer, educator and author with twenty-five years of professional experience. Her most recent project is a game called Walden, a game based on Henry David Thoreau’s experiment in living at Walden Pond. She is currently Director of the joint USC Games Program, which is a collaboration between the School of Cinematic Arts and the Viterbi School of Engineering. Tracy is the author of Game Design Workshop: A Playcentric Approach to Designing Innovative Games. This design textbook is in use at game programs worldwide. Her research lab, the  Game Innovation Lab, is a leading center for game design research.​​​​​​​

Previous Quest2019  Posts

Dedication and Devotion

Dedication to Fairness

Dedication to Love

 

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