See if you can remember a time in your life when you weren’t crazy-busy. What did you like to do then?

These are the memories that come up for me:

  • Laying on the lawn and gazing up to find images in the clouds drifting overhead.
  • Making up elaborate stories and playing them out with my friends
  • Teaching myself to sew.
  • Hanging out with friends for hours, with no particular agenda in mind

Writing these things makes me realize that these memories are all from my childhood and teen years. It’s been probably decades since I did any cloud-gazing! Maybe you, too, have to go back decades to remember when you weren’t all about doing, a time when you had opportunities to just be.

In turbulent times the pressures to be busy, giving, doing, performing, achieving and making a difference intensify. Yet we can’t add hours per week of activism without figuring out how to do less of something else. You may want to spend some time identifying how to find time for making a difference.

If you could get unbusy tomorrow, what would you do less of? What would you do more of?

This handout might help you discover your answers.


Alicia K. Anderson raises unexpected questions about what self care isFinding time for sef-care is often at the bottom of our priority lists, and it’s often seen as making time for grand gestures.. She says, “Self-care is taking care of myself, respecting myself, and honoring myself in each moment of the day-not just during down time after dinner.  I need to give my Self the small, constant, consistent gestures of love and respect that build a solid long-term relationship. Perhaps this kind of self-care is something we can find time for every day. Read what she has to say in My Self-Care Mistake.


More about getting unbusy

Making Time to Make A Difference

A Tangled Web

What Your Busyness Might Be Telling You