We use the word “hope” in so many ways. There’s small “h” hope and capital “h” hope. Small “h” hope expresses our everyday wishes and expectations. We say things like, “I hope it doesn’t rain tomorrow,”  “I hope you feel better soon,” or, “Let’s hope the bus isn’t late.” These hopes express our wishes for ourselves and one another, reflecting the rhythms and dailiness of our lives.

Capital “H” hope is more complex, addressing larger issues in the world around us. Capital “H” hopes speak to our hopes for the things that impact our lives now, and the lives of future generations. These include our hopes for environmental sustainability, for social justice, or for a fix to our broken political system.

Both kinds of hope matter. They fuel our actions for building better lives and a better world. Yet today, hope can be hard to find and hold onto. To change that, we need the Department of Hope (DOH). The DOH keeps hope alive for us and those we connect with. It’s where we can share inspiration, ideas, resources, and experiences.

The DOH isn’t a real department found within any government or private organization.The DOH is made up of you, me and hundreds (thousands!) of others around the world.

Visit often. Share your experiences. Let’s build the DOH together!

What’s It Like to Be 60?

Courage is the measure of our heartfelt participation with life, with another, with a community, a work; a future…Courage is what love looks like when tested by the simple everyday necessities of being alive. ~ David Whyte, Consolations: The Solace, Nourishment and...

Hope in an Unlikely Place

Recently, I participated in training with John Evans and Karen Jooste on leading others in writing for health. One of the approaches we learned is expressive writing, as developed and researched by James Pennebaker. The Pennebaker paradigm has been shown, through 3 decades of research, to help people integrate traumatic or very difficult experiences…


Crisis and Hope

My town borders West Baltimore, scene of violence, looting and fires last night as Baltimore erupted in the wake of Freddie Gray's death while in police custody.  A sad night as my son and his girlfriend looked out at shop windows smashed and fires burning in East...

Hope Embodied

Remembering Martin Luther King, Jr. with awe and gratitude. His commitment, vision, courage and message are as meaningful and as inspirational today as they were 42 years ago. He embodied hope. We need that hope today as much as we ever did. King was a...

Welcome to the Department of Hope

The Department of Hope isn’t a part of any government, agency or organization.
It has no budget, no building, no board of directors. But it is more than just an idea. It is a force for good. It is what we deeply believe in and dearly value. It’s what we do.


Hope

We need hope to see how to make our own lives, others’ lives and this one world of ours a better place. That’s my purpose in life.


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